Professor Lydia Bourouiba featured in “Storied Women of MIT” series

March 29th, 20182018 News in Brief

Assistant Professor Lydia Bourouiba was featured in the “Storied Women of MIT” video series for Women's History Month. The video highlights Bourouiba’s contributions to the field of fluid mechanics as they are applied to disease transmission. The series was produced by MIT Video Productions. Watch the video here.

Assistant Professor Lydia Bourouiba was featured in the “Storied Women of MIT” video series for Women’s History Month. The video highlights Bourouiba’s contributions to the field of fluid mechanics as they are applied to disease transmission. The series was produced by MIT Video Productions. Watch the video here.

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Abroad in Israel: Settling in and learning the ropes

March 16th, 2018Undergraduate Student Life

By Amy Vogel ’20 I have been in Israel now for about 3 weeks, and loving every minute of it. After I got off the plane, I got to spend a few nice days with my family in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem before heading up to Haifa. We celebrated the Jewish holiday of Purim together, which was a lot of fun! Two weeks ago on Sunday, I moved into my dorm at the Technion ("the MIT of Israel"). I live in an apartment-style dorm shared with four other international research students, and they are great roommates! My airplane right before landing in Tel Aviv The professor I am working for here is Tomer Toledo, PhD ’03 in Civil and Environmental Engineering/ Transportation Research Institute at MIT. My first official day of work was the Monday after I moved in, and one of Tomer's students, Omar, welcomed me and showed me around. For his PhD, Omar is working on designing efficient toll lane systems with dynamic pricing, and this is also the project I'll be working on while I'm here. Last week was mostly my orientation to the school and to the research; I learned how to use a transportation-modeling software called TransModeler. I also learned about the Cell Transmission Model (CTM), which can be used for lots of different things, but in this case we are applying it to modeling traffic flow. This week I got to work on building a MATLAB program that would read in data from TransModeler [...]

By Amy Vogel ’20

I have been in Israel now for about 3 weeks, and loving every minute of it. After I got off the plane, I got to spend a few nice days with my family in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem before heading up to Haifa. We celebrated the Jewish holiday of Purim together, which was a lot of fun! Two weeks ago on Sunday, I moved into my dorm at the Technion (“the MIT of Israel”). I live in an apartment-style dorm shared with four other international research students, and they are great roommates!

My airplane right before landing in Tel Aviv

The professor I am working for here is Tomer Toledo, PhD ’03 in Civil and Environmental Engineering/ Transportation Research Institute at MIT. My first official day of work was the Monday after I moved in, and one of Tomer’s students, Omar, welcomed me and showed me around. For his PhD, Omar is working on designing efficient toll lane systems with dynamic pricing, and this is also the project I’ll be working on while I’m here.

Last week was mostly my orientation to the school and to the research; I learned how to use a transportation-modeling software called TransModeler. I also learned about the Cell Transmission Model (CTM), which can be used for lots of different things, but in this case we are applying it to modeling traffic flow.

This week I got to work on building a MATLAB program that would read in data from TransModeler and run macroscopic simulations. In other words, while TransModeler will show each individual car driving along the highway, we are interested in modeling the overall flow of cars on the highway, and how that changes with time.

Running a practice simulation on TransModeler (look familiar?)

Since I started work, I have met a handful of the other graduate students working on related projects, many of whom are also Tomer’s students. And I’ve had some fun, too!

Last weekend I went into Haifa’s German Colony with my roommate, and we walked by the Bahai Gardens and then ate at a delicious restaurant called Fattoush. This week, I tried out an acting/improv class for people trying to learn Hebrew, and I had a lot of fun with that!

View of Bahai Gardens

Delicious food at Fattoush

I haven’t decided yet how I’ll spend this weekend, but I am looking forward to the many weeks and weekends to come, and hope to have as many interesting experiences as I can squeeze into three months.

Amy Vogel ’20 is studying abroad in Israel at Technion this semester, where she is working alongside Tomer Toledo, PhD ’03.

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Research from Professor David Simchi-Levi shows that traditional sampling method can be used to address inventory constraints

March 15th, 20182018 News in Brief

Research from Professor David Simchi-Levi shows that the Thompson sampling method, developed in the 1930s, can be combined with a linear algorithm to address revenue management problems. Simchi-Levi demonstrates that the Thompson sampling can be naturally combined with a classical linear program formulation to include inventory constraints, and can be applied in airline, internet advertising and online retail industries. The paper was accepted for publication in Operations Research. Read more on MIT News.

Research from Professor David Simchi-Levi shows that the Thompson sampling method, developed in the 1930s, can be combined with a linear algorithm to address revenue management problems. Simchi-Levi demonstrates that the Thompson sampling can be naturally combined with a classical linear program formulation to include inventory constraints, and can be applied in airline, internet advertising and online retail industries. The paper was accepted for publication in Operations Research. Read more on MIT News.

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Professor Penny Chisholm featured in “Storied Women of MIT” series

March 13th, 20182018 News in Brief

Institute Professor Penny Chisholm was featured in the “Storied Women of MIT” video series for Women's History Month. Chisholm is highlighted for her role in discovering Prochlorococcus, the smallest, most abundant photosynthetic organism. The series was produced by MIT Video Productions. Watch the video here.

Institute Professor Penny Chisholm was featured in the “Storied Women of MIT” video series for Women’s History Month. Chisholm is highlighted for her role in discovering Prochlorococcus, the smallest, most abundant photosynthetic organism. The series was produced by MIT Video Productions. Watch the video here.

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Research from Professor Franz-Josef Ulm featured in Forbes

March 9th, 20182018 News in Brief

Research from Professor Franz-Josef Ulm and research scientist Roland Pellenq was featured in Forbes. The pair found that cities with grid-like designs have more heat buildup than cities with more chaotic layouts, making these cities hotter than their surrounding areas. The research was published in Physical Review Letters. Read more here.

Research from Professor Franz-Josef Ulm and research scientist Roland Pellenq was featured in Forbes. The pair found that cities with grid-like designs have more heat buildup than cities with more chaotic layouts, making these cities hotter than their surrounding areas. The research was published in Physical Review Letters. Read more here.

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CEE receives top ranking from QS World University Rankings

March 2nd, 20182018 News in Brief

The 2018 QS World University Rankings were recently released and CEE is ranked among the top. The department was named number one for Civil and Structural Engineering and number three for Environmental Science. MIT was ranked the number one university. QS World University Rankings are intended to educate prospective students about the leading schools in their preferred field. A complete list of MIT subjects ranked can be found on MIT News.

The 2018 QS World University Rankings were recently released and CEE is ranked among the top. The department was named number one for Civil and Structural Engineering and number three for Environmental Science. MIT was ranked the number one university. QS World University Rankings are intended to educate prospective students about the leading schools in their preferred field. A complete list of MIT subjects ranked can be found on MIT News.

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